Safer at Home FAQ

Updated May 25, 2020 at 2:00 p.m.

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Colorado is moving from the Stay-at-Home level into the Safer at Home level. While at this level, Coloradans are strongly advised to continue staying at home to the greatest extent possible, only interacting with your household contacts and only leaving for essential activities. At-risk individuals, such as people 65 and older,  should continue to stay at home unless absolutely necessary. This new level also includes some changes for commerce. 

About Safer-at-Home

Coloradans are no longer ordered to stay home, but are strongly advised to stay at home. Critical businesses are open and limited non-critical businesses are operating with strict precautions in place. 
 

Under the Safer at Home order there is more flexibility for businesses to open if they are following Social Distancing Requirements. There also is more flexibility for consumers -- except for seniors and other vulnerable populations to get goods and services they desire, and for employers to begin bringing employees back to the workplace as long as they follow social distancing guidelines and wear a cloth face covering.

  • Coloradans should continue staying home as much as possible.

  • When you go out, you should follow physical distancing requirements (6 feet of space between yourself

    and others) and wear a face covering.

  • Older adults over 65 years of age and vulnerable people at high risk of severe illness from COVID-19

    should follow Stay-at-Home recommendations, which means taking extra precautions to maintain

    physical distance and only leaving home for medical care and essential activities. Vulnerable individuals

    cannot be compelled to perform in-person work for any business or government function,

    including a Critical Business or Critical Government Function.

  • People who are sick, or have a household member who is sick with COVID-19 like symptoms, should still

    stay home from work and limit social interactions as much as possible.

Colorado is asking everyone to wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities like grocery shopping, going to work or walking your dog. Please make or buy a cloth covering that will cover your mouth and nose and use it whenever you are outside your own house or yard. Scarves and bandanas will work as coverings. Wash your face covering regularly.

All workers should wear medical or non-medical face coverings that cover the  mouth and nose while at work, except where doing so would inhibit health, and to wear gloves (if gloves are provided by an employer) when in contact with customers or goods.

Activities, tasks, and errands you must do to keep yourself, your family, and your household members safe and healthy. Essential activities include:

  • Getting essential medical care, medical supplies and equipment, and medicine.

  • Getting food and supplies for yourself, your family, your pets, and your household members. That means the supplies you need to live a healthy life, keep a safe and healthy home, and get supplies you need to work or learn at home.

  • Caring for a family member, vulnerable person, or animals that are in a different location than your home.

  • Walking your dog or feeding animals.

  • Outdoor activities such as walking, hiking, cross-country skiing, running, etc. Group sizes are limited to 10 and groups must follow Social Distancing Requirements.

  • Going to work.

  • Keeping 6 feet of physical distance between all people at all times. The 6-foot rule does not apply to people who live in the same house as you -- in other words,  your roommates, and family. But if you, your family, or your roommates get sick, you or they must isolate.

  • Washing hands as often as you can. Wash with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.

  • Covering coughs and sneezes. Use a tissue, then throw the tissue away. Use your sleeve or inner elbow if a tissue is not available.

  • Regularly cleaning high-touch surfaces.

  • Not shaking hands.

  • Wear a mask or face covering.

Under Safer at Home, weddings, elopements, other small events, may resume as long as the gatherings are of 10 or fewer people and physical distancing (6 feet apart) is observed. Event staff are required to wear face covering and appropriate protective equipment as needed and required by OSHA standards.

Special event venues do not include:
Movie and performance theaters, opera houses, concert halls, and music halls.

While the Safer-at-Home level is in effect, gatherings in both public and private spaces of more than 10 people are prohibited. We advise continuing to only socialize with members of your household. Any gatherings of 10 or fewer people outside your household should adhere to all Social Distancing requirements and recommendations. 

The change from Stay-at-home to Safer at Home is about establishing a more sustainable way of living for Coloradans during this pandemic. While at the Safer at Home level, it is critical for Coloradans to continue staying home as much as possible. Higher-risk individuals and people 65 and older should continue staying at home and only leave for essential activities. This Safer at Home level will also allow for more economic activity, more personal well-being, and more geographic differentiation while ensuring public health and safety.

Gov. Polis signed Executive Order D 2020 091, amending and extending Safer at Home. The order currently expires on July 1, 2020, but can be amended or extended at any time.

Colorado has been doing a great job following the Stay-at-Home order, and we must keep it up. The virus will continue to transmit with spikes and declines of cases until a vaccine is developed and widely available. The virus is still present in Colorado and can surge at any time. We may move between these different levels during the pandemic: 

  • Level 1: Stay at Home. Everyone is required to stay at home except for grocery shopping, medical care, exercise, and necessary activities. Only critical businesses are open.

  • Level 2: Safer at Home. Everyone is still strongly advised to stay at home. Critical businesses are open and non-critical businesses are operating with restrictions.

  • Level 3: Protect Our Neighbors. With more testing and monitoring, it will be safer for people to socialize more normally, while taking significant precautions. We will still need strong protections for higher risk individuals. 

The governor won’t hesitate to take the necessary steps to protect the health and safety of Coloradans, including going back to the Stay-at-Home Level or promulgating more restrictions. It is everyone’s personal responsibility to know and follow current orders. During Safer at Home, we must continue staying home as much as possible, and take the necessary steps like washing hands and wearing a mask when leaving the house.

At-Risk Individuals

Individuals who are 65 years and older; individuals with chronic lung disease or moderate to severe asthma; individuals who have serious heart conditions; individuals who are immunocompromised; pregnant women; and individuals determined to be high risk by a licensed healthcare provider are considered vulnerable under Executive Order D 2020 091. Vulnerable people at high risk of severe illness from COVID-19 should follow Stay-at-Home recommendations, which means only leaving home for medical care and essential activities.
 

Per Safer at Home Executive Order D 2020-091, no vulnerable individuals can be compelled by their employer to return to work if their work requires in person work near others. If the workplace is particularly unsafe -- e.g., if it had an outbreak -- unemployment benefits might be available, depending on the facts, and OSHA safety rules might limit requirements to return.
 

No, it’s illegal to discriminate against anyone based on age, disability, pregnancy. Anyone believing they have been discriminated against or not accommodated should contact Colorado Civil Rights Division or the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

If you live with someone who is a vulnerable population, you also should follow stay at home guidelines to the greatest extent possible so as not to bring exposure into your household. 
 

If it is not safe for you to remain home, you are able and urged to find another safe place to stay during this order. Please reach out so we can help. You may call the domestic violence hotline at 1-800-799-7233 or contact your local law enforcement.

Higher risk populations and people 65 and older should stay at home as much as possible. Higher-risk people should follow the terms of the previous Stay-at-Home Order.

We encourage people experiencing homelessness to practice social distancing. 
Additionally, DOLA is working with state and local partners who provide services to our unhoused Coloradans through a statewide homeless taskforce. (link provided below)

HUD has also developed an Infectious Disease Toolkit for Continuums of Care (CoC) to prepare for and manage the spread of infectious disease in shelters.

Finally, DOLA, CDPHE, and other partner agencies have created guidance for homeless care providers that is posted on the DOLA  website.  

Some of the main focus points for the homeless are as follows:

Businesses

Office functions may resume under Safer at Home, if abiding by Office-based business guidelines.

On June 1, 2020, Governor Polis signed Executive Order D 2020 091. Per this order, "Any business or activity not addressed in this Executive Order or any accompanying PHO may operate in accordance with general guidance from CDPHE concerning group limitations, Social Distancing Requirements, and sanitation and cleaning protocols."

You may review all current Public Health Orders here.

You may review business and/or industry specific guidance here, under "Guidance by Sector.

  • Bars, taverns, brew pubs, breweries, microbreweries, distillery pubs, wineries, tasting rooms, special licensees, clubs, and other places of public accommodation offering alcoholic beverages for on-premises consumption unless the establishment ensures access to food from a licensed retail food establishment for on-premise consumption

  • Cigar bars

  • Movie and performance theaters except for drive in movie theaters, opera houses, concert halls, and music halls

  • Casinos, amusement parks and arcades

  • Campground group facilities, pavilions, cabins, and yurts

  • Retailers and service providers operating in an indoor mall that do not have their own exterior entrance from the outside

  • Lockers for gyms, recreation centers, and pools

All open businesses must operate in accordance with industry/business specific guidance, or general guidance from CDPHE concerning group limitations, social distancing requirements, and sanitation and cleaning protocols. Please reference guidance here, under "Guidance by Sector," and reference the most recent Public Health Orders.

All workplaces should:

  • Maintain 6 feet between all people at all times as much as  possible.

  • Frequently clean all high-touch areas.

  • Conduct daily temperature checks and monitor symptoms in employees, logging all results.

  • Consider staggering or altering shifts to reduce the number of employees onsite at once.

  • Provide appropriate protective gear like gloves, masks, and face coverings and encourage appropriate use.

  • Ensure workers:

  • Take breaks to wash hands or use hand sanitizer.

  • Wear masks and gloves.

  • Stay home if they are sick. 

 
Specific guidance for businesses can be found at covid19.colorado.gov/safer-at-home.

Businesses will only be allowed to open if they are in compliance with Safer at Home requirements, and it is in a business’ best interest to ensure the safety of their customers. The state will work with local public health departments on enforcement for these requirements.

Critical businesses that were open under the Stay-at-Home order will remain open during the Safer at Home level with the same strict precautions (physical  distancing, masks for all employees, more frequent cleanings, etc.). Critical businesses must continue to comply with distancing requirements at all times, adopt work from home or telework policies for any operations that can be done remotely, and implement other strategies, such as staggered schedules or redesigning workplaces, to create more distance between workers unless doing so would make it impossible to carry out critical functions. A list of critical businesses is available at covid19.colorado.gov/critical-businesses.

Child Care

Yes. Licensed child care services are open under specific guidance from public health. Child care facilities are encouraged to remain open to provide services for whomever might need them.  Any questions concerning licensed child care services should be sent to the Colorado Department of Human Services, Office of Early Childhood, Childcare Licensing and Administration at cdhs_oec_communications@state.co.us or 1-800-799-5876 or 303-866-5948. 

Under the Stay-at-Home order child care was deemed an essential business and childcare for essential workers was subsidized. Under Safer at Home child care facilities can expand or reopen if they are able to implement the public health and licensing guidelines put in place for operating during COVID.

Yes. Schools that provide free food services to students will continue on a pick-up and take-home basis.

Education

Under Executive Order D 2020 041, normal in-person instruction at all P-12 schools in Colorado will be suspended until the scheduled end of the 2019-2020 regular school year. The Governor is hopeful that students can return to in-person learning in the fall, but Colorado’s public health experts will analyze the data and latest information to determine the best course of action. 

The Governor is directing the Colorado Department of Higher Education (CDHE)  to work with CDPHE to identify programs and courses at postsecondary institutions that cannot be taught remotely and require limited in-person instruction. CDHE, with input from CDPHE, will develop a process by which institutions can propose specific courses and programs and attest to following Social Distancing Requirements and meeting other hygiene requirements. 

Executive Order D 2020 041 covers in-person instruction for the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year. The Governor and Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment will evaluate the latest data in the coming weeks and months to make a decision about summer school.

Enforcement

Colorado law requires compliance with executive and public health orders; therefore, not following these orders is breaking the law. We all must do our part to ensure success, and call upon all people in Colorado to voluntarily comply. Local law enforcement agencies can enforce public health orders. State law enforcement will assist and support in any way requested, but voluntary compliance is critical. Law enforcement involvement is reserved for the most aggravated circumstances.

Gov. Polis has created an advisory board to support coordination across multiple jurisdictions on compliance and enforcement of the Safer at Home order with the goal of maximizing physical distancing compliance. The advisory board is specifically focused on how local governments and local public health can coordinate with the state on educating the public about these regulations and maximizing compliance and enforcement efforts during the COVID-19 crisis.

They are mandatory.

No. The Colorado National Guard will be supporting logistics, transportation, and medical response efforts. The Guard will not be enforcing this order. 

Residents should contact their local public health agency to report any potential violations of an order.

For more information about public health orders and how they are enforced click here.

People are advised to wear a non-medical cloth face covering that covers the nose and mouth whenever in public, but it is not a requirement. You will not be fined or jailed. Again, we are calling on all Coloradans to voluntarily comply with the orders and recommendations.

Residents should contact their local public health agency to report any potential violations of an order.

Health Care

It is important to seek medical care if you need it. If you are feeling sick, call your doctor, a nurse hotline, or a telehealth hotline. If you are experiencing COVID-19 symptoms or are currently in isolation, you should stay at home and follow the guidelines provided by your physician. When possible, health care visits should still be done remotely. Contact your healthcare provider to see what telehealth services they provide or visit this directory for more information. 

If you are having a medical emergency of any kind, call 911.

Non-emergency or elective health and dental services can begin April 27. Executive Order D 2020 45, allowing elective surgeries to resume, applies statewide, regardless of local jurisdiction orders.

Yes. Pharmacies and other medical services will remain open.  Consider having prescriptions delivered to your home.

Labor and Employment

  • You might be eligible for unemployment benefits depending on the circumstances of your reduced wages or hours. The CARES Act provides additional benefits to those who have exhausted their regular unemployment benefits and to those who are gig workers, self-employed, or otherwise might not qualify for unemployment benefits. It also provides an additional $600/week for all eligible unemployment claimants. 

  • More information on the types of unemployment available can be found here

  • To file a claim visit www.coloradoui.gov.

  • Per Safer at Home Executive Order D 2020 044, no vulnerable individuals can be compelled by their employer to return to work if their work requires in person work near others. 

  • Employers must accommodate vulnerable individuals with remote work options, if the work can be done remotely.  

  • If you refuse to return to work, are fired or quit due to unsatisfactory or hazardous working conditions, you may be eligible for unemployment to the degree of risk involved to your health.

  • If an employer requires work from an employee entitled to paid leave (due to illness or a quarantine/isolation order) under the Colorado HELP Rules, that would be unlawful under those rules, and should be reported to the contact information at the bottom of these FAQs.

  • Any other possible violations of social distancing, or other health and safety orders, should be reported to the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration or County health officials. https://www.osha.gov/contactus/bystate/CO/areaoffice

  • Federal law requires up to two weeks paid leave for those who work for employers with fewer than 500 employees (though some employers with 50 or fewer employees may be exempt). The Colorado Health Emergency Leave with Pay Rules (“Colorado HELP Rules”) adds coverage for all workers in the following, regardless of employer size:

    • leisure and hospitality (arts, entertainment, recreation, hotels/motels, and other accommodations).

    • food services (restaurants, coffee shops, bars, caterers, cafeterias, etc.).

    • retail establishments (of all kinds).

    • real estate sales and leasing.

    • other office workers (both employers that operate entirely in offices and, at mainly non-office employers (e.g., factories), the subset of employees who are office workers).

    • elective medical, dental, and health services.

    • personal care services (defined as hair, beauty, spas, massage, tattoos, pet care, or substantially similar services).

    • food and beverage manufacturing.

    • child care.

    • education at all levels (including related services, including but not limited to cafeterias and transportation to, from, and on campuses).

    • home health care working with elderly, disabled, ill, or otherwise high-risk individuals.

    • nursing homes and community living facilities.

  • Employees with COVID-19 symptoms who are either (1) being tested for COVID-19 or (2) under instructions from a health care provider or authorized government official to quarantine or isolate due to a risk of having COVID-19. The requirement to provide paid sick leave ends if an employee receives a negative COVID-19 test result.

  • Federal law provides additional paid leave for child care needs due to coronavirus-caused closures of schools or child care establishments.

  • If the federal paid leave rules apply (for most employees at employers with fewer than 500 employees): Two weeks of pay (up to 80 hours) at the employee’s regular pay rate.

  • If the federal paid leave rules do not apply (for employers above 500 employees, and some below 50), but the Colorado HELP Rules do: Two weeks of pay (up to 80 hours) at two-thirds of the employee’s regular pay rate.

  • Federal law provides two weeks of pay at two-thirds of the employee’s regular rate for child care needs due to coronavirus-caused closures of schools or child care establishments, or the need to care for an individual subject to quarantine. An additional 10 weeks of expanded family and medical leave at two-thirds of the employee’s regular rate is available for child care needs due to coronavirus-caused closures of schools or child care establishments.

Local Governments

Nothing in the Executive Order prohibits a county from enacting more protective standards,  including but not limited to stay-at-home orders or additional protective measures.  

Any county wishing to apply for a local variance from part or all of the Executive Order for less restrictive measures must submit a written application to CDPHE certifying that the county has low case counts and/or can document 14 consecutive days of decline in COVID-19 cases reported in the county. The application must include a written COVID-19 suppression plan approved by the appropriate local public health authority, and all hospitals within the county (unless no hospitals are located in the county) and a majority of  the county commissioners, or (in the case of the City of Denver) the mayor of Denver, or (in the case of Broomfield) the City Council. 

CDPHE shall review and approve a county-specific COVID-19 suppression plan that meets the department's public health standards. CDPHE shall not provide COVID-19 preparedness grant funding to any county that implements measures that are less restrictive than the standards contained in state orders without first obtaining approval from CDPHE.

The most restrictive terms of either the state or local orders apply. So if the city or county’s order is more restrictive than the state order, follow the city or county order.

Under the Safer at Home level, local governments will have a variety of options when it comes to slowing the spread of the virus and protecting their communities:

  • Local governments can implement the guidelines of Safer at Home to match the state.

  • Local governments can go farther than the state, including but not limited to stay-at-home orders or additional protective measures.

  • Local governments can relax guidelines more than the state. To do so, local governments will need to demonstrate proof of 14 consecutive days of decline of infection of COVID-19 in the county .Local governments also must submit an application to CDPHE that includes a written COVID-19 suppression plan approved by the appropriate local public health authority, all hospitals within the jurisdiction and elected leadership. 

Colorado residents should follow the state’s guidance unless their local government has received a variance from the state or is enforcing more restrictive orders than the state. 
 

There is a process outlined in the executive order for a county to apply for a variance from the Safer at Home order, and both counties and municipalities can implement stronger restrictions on their own. The strongest restrictions should be followed.

Masks and Gloves

Colorado is asking everyone to wear a non-medical cloth face covering while out in public for necessary activities like grocery shopping, going to work or walking your dog. Please make or buy a cloth covering that will cover your mouth and nose and use it whenever you are outside your own house or yard. Scarves and bandanas will work as coverings. Wash your face covering regularly.

All workers should wear medical or non-medical face coverings that cover the  mouth and nose while at work, except where doing so would inhibit health, and to wear gloves (if gloves are provided by an employer) when in contact with customers or goods.

A medical grade face mask is also called a surgical mask. These are disposable, fluid-resistant masks that provide the wearer protection against large droplets, splashes, or sprays of bodily or other hazardous fluids. They also protect others from the wearer’s respiratory emissions.  Surgical masks do not provide the wearer reliable protection from inhaling smaller airborne particles. N95 or other types of respirators should be considered if available and if the wearer seeks protection from small particle aerosols.

Non-critical health care services providers are required to wear disposable patient examination gloves such as nitrile, rubber, polychloroprene, or vinyl gloves. Personal service providers (e.g., hair stylists) are recommended to wear the same.

Pets

Pet supply stores and veterinary services will remain open. You are allowed to walk your dog and seek medical care for your pet should they require it. Be sure to practice physical distancing while out on walks, maintaining at least 6 feet from other neighbors and their pets.

Places of Worship

During the Safer at Home level, gatherings in both public and private spaces of more than 10 people are prohibited. Places of worship are encouraged to continue providing access to services online or drive-up worship (as long as vehicles are turned off and not idling). Additional guidance can be found here.

Local and Personal Recreation

No.

It is physically and mentally healthy to be outdoors. Stay close to home and choose times and places where you can maintain 6 feet of physical distance between yourself and others.

  • Recreate locally. Keep recreational activities within 10 miles of home to prevent disease spread. 

  • If you are in the Denver metro area, don't travel to our mountain communities.

  • Reduce visits to the trails and open spaces in the foothills.

  • Similarly, if you live outside the Denver metro area, avoid traveling to Denver for recreational activities.

  • Individuals may participate in local and personal recreation in outside public spaces, as an authorized Necessary Activity, in groups no larger than 10 and practicing social distancing maintaining 6 feet between participants. 

  • Playgrounds, playground equipment, and gymnasiums remain closed. Gymnasiums include fitness, dance, exercise or group classes, exercise studios and centers, recreation centers, bowling alleys, pools, and other indoor athletic facilities. 

  • Personal training and classes in any setting limited to 4 or fewer individuals complying with Social Distancing Requirements and does not utilize any shared equipment are allowed.

  • Wear a mask when participating in activities.

  • It is best to socialize only with your household members, but physical activity promotes health and well-being. If you are engaging in outdoor activities with people outside your household, limit group size to 10 or fewer, and make sure there is at least 6 feet of physical distance between all people at all times. Specific counties may have different rules on allowable group sizes; please follow your county’s rules and read and obey signs that may be posted in the parks and on trails.

  • People should not gather in any outdoor space where they cannot maintain 6 feet of physician distance from one another. That includes pavilions, areas that offer shelter, or other outdoors areas that invite people to congregate in groups and do not allow for 6 feet of physical distance. 

  • State parks are open for walking, biking, etc., but all playgrounds, picnic areas, campgrounds, and other areas where groups might gather are closed. Restrooms in state parks are open. Please practice good handwashing and distancing if using state park restrooms.

  • For city and county parks, check with your local government or parks department to find out whether parks are open and whether the park restroom facilities are open.

  • Playgrounds are closed. If you find one that is open, we recommend you do not use it.

Golf courses can remain open as an allowable outdoor activity; however, physical distancing requirements must be strictly followed. Clubhouses, restaurants, snack bars and pro shops must not be open and tee times and golf fee transactions made only online. Only household members may share a golf cart or be a caddy for a golfer. Golfers are strongly encouraged to not touch any equipment that is not their own (e.g. tees and flags).

Gyms will remain closed under  Safer at Home, and that includes fitness studios such as yoga, pilates, barre, etc. 
 
You can do indoor personal training/classes with a maximum of four people unless everyone lives in the same household. For example, a family of five can train together. Those from different households must be physically distant and can have no shared equipment.
 
Coloradans can play tennis and basketball only with less than four people, and only with those from your own household. 

Private camping

Effective May 25, private campsites may reopen.

If a host county would like to keep campsites closed, county commissioners should consult with their local public health agency, and then notify the Colorado Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and CDPHE in writing.

Restaurants & bars

Effective May 27th, 2020, restaurants may open to in-person dining indoors at 50% of the posted occupancy code
limit, not to exceed 50 people, whichever is less. Tables or groups must be limited to no more than 8 people and
be spaced so that patrons are a minimum of 6 feet apart. Restaurants may also use any existing (and new space if
your city code allows) licensed outdoor space for in-person dining with the same group limit of 8 and minimum
spacing of patrons 6 feet apart. Restaurants must work with local authorities to get authorization for expanding
space to accommodate outdoor dine-in for adjacent or nonadjacent public or private spaces.

Restaurants can only open for in-person dining if the following requirements can be met:

  • Patrons in different parties must be a minimum of 6 feet apart. The spacing of tables should be 6 feet or more to ensure proper physical distancing between diners from different parties.
  • All employees must wear face coverings.
  • Ensure maximum ventilation by opening windows and minimizing air conditioning to the extent possible.
  • Deep clean and disinfect all shared surfaces between parties/at each turnover.
  • Parties must stay seated together and will not be allowed to mingle with other parties.

Read the guidance for restaurants.

Yes. Since food trucks have a license to serve food, they are allowed.

No, establishments that do not serve food will be evaluated in June.

The intent of this guidance is to open establishments in which people traditionally associate only with those in their party and for the primary purpose of dine-in service, or what is colloquially referred to as “restaurants.” So, whether something can open as a restaurant depends on whether the establishment is set up to host patrons for meals. In many cases, this is straightforward when an establishment already functions as a conventional restaurant and has a full service kitchen.

There may be some establishments, like breweries with large indoor and outdoor spaces, that want to change their business model to re-open and operate like a restaurant. In these cases, food must be provided by a licensed retail food establishment. Establishments can form partnerships with neighboring restaurants to provide food (like, for example Carboy in Denver), or can partner with food trucks (like, for example Quiero Arepas Food Truck). Light snacks (like bar nuts) or things that are commercially prepared somewhere else and heated up in a microwave on premises (like Hot Pockets) don’t count as food service. Allowing patrons to bring in their own takeout or order food from an app does not count either.

In all cases, establishments must operate according to the new guidelines, which include having patrons dine in defined groups of up to 8 people who are seated, not allowing patrons to mingle with other groups, observing spacing and hygiene requirements, preferably utilizing a reservation system, and requesting patrons wear a face covering when not eating or drinking.

All decisions are based on consideration of the potential for exposure to COVID-19 and how feasible it is to adhere to public health guidelines in each setting. It's important to note that all places of public accommodation subject to Public Health Order 20-22, that offer food and beverages may continue to offer food and beverage using delivery service, window service, walk-up service, drive-through service, drive-up service, and curbside delivery. This includes bars, taverns, brew pubs, breweries, microbreweries, distillery pubs, wineries, limited wineries, tasting rooms, special licensees, clubs, and other places of public accommodation serving alcoholic beverages. We are closely evaluating the public health data to assess the next steps in Safer at Home.

While it is not possible to eliminate the risk of COVID-19 exposure, restaurants will have to take a number of safety precautions in order to open for in-person dining. This includes steps taken to ensure the safety of the space, employees and customers. Read the full guidance.

Coloradans should contact their local public health department if they believe a business isn’t following proper physical distancing or other requirements and endangering the lives of their customers and staff. Restaurants that operate in violation of public health orders risk a number of enforcement measures, including indefinite suspension of their license for health hazards.

Travel and Transportation

Travel from your home to places you need to go to do necessary tasks, errands and activities, get food or necessary equipment and supplies, transport kids for a shared parenting arrangement or child care, or go to work when required to be in the workplace. Travel for Necessary Activity should occur within an individual’s local community or as necessary to access outdoor recreation areas. If traveling outside their community, Coloradans are urged to honor all restrictions in place at their destination and avoid travel to counties or municipalities that issue travel restrictions. Local authorities have the discretion to close recreation as needed.

Public transportation and ridesharing should be used for essential travel only. When possible, walk,bike, or drive yourself.

No, the roads will not be closed. You should only travel if it is essential to your work or health.

During Safer at Home all Coloradans should stay at home as much as possible. The federal government regulates interstate travel.

Planes and any other form of travel should only be used for essential purposes.

Do not take a "Colorado vacation." Travel should occur within an individual’s local community or as necessary to access outdoor recreation areas. If traveling outside their community, Coloradans are urged to honor all restrictions in place at their destination and avoid travel to counties or municipalities that issue travel restrictions. Be sure to review local orders for additional information: https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/cdphe/find-your-local-public-health-agency.

Travel should occur within an individual’s local community or as necessary to access outdoor recreation areas. If traveling outside their community, Coloradans are urged to honor all restrictions in place at their destination and avoid travel to counties or municipalities that issue travel restrictions. Be sure to review local orders for additional information: https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/cdphe/find-your-local-public-health-agency.

Spring skiing

The Executive Order that closed ski resorts has expired. Ski resorts must work to secure approval from their local authorities in order to open.

Summer camps

Day camps will be able to open starting on June 1. Residential overnight camps are prohibited in June. Decisions for July and August overnight camps will be made in mid-June. Children’s residential camps that choose to operate as day camps must work with the Colorado Department of Human Services and their local public health agency (LPHA) for approval. Day camps, including mobile and outdoor camps, must operate with restrictions and strong precautionary measures, as specified in the guidance.

All decisions are based on consideration of the potential for exposure to COVID-19 and how feasible it is to adhere to public health guidelines in each setting. Kids at overnight camps spend longer periods of time with each other, and it is more challenging to keep them in cohorted groups. In addition, many of the facilities for overnight camps are difficult to thoroughly disinfect between each camper’s use. We will re-evaluate the data in mid-June to determine whether overnight camps can open for July or August.

Outdoor day camps may be held with up to 25 campers per group. Indoor day camps remain at 10 campers per room which includes four walls and a door. Groups of campers must remain with the same group and not mix with other groups during structured time or free time. Campers both indoors and outdoors must be spaced 6 feet apart, to the greatest extent possible.