Getting outpatient treatment for COVID-19

Last updated on July 1, 2022.

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If you test positive or think you might have COVID-19, you may be able to get treatment to help you recover. Treatment works best if it’s taken within a few days of when you first got sick. It’s important to seek treatment fast to lower your risk of serious illness.

If you have mild to moderate symptoms and your symptoms began within the past few days, call your doctor or health care provider as soon as you can to ask about treatment. If you do not have a provider or health insurance, you can find a place to get treatment using CDPHE’s treatment map.

Coloradans can use the federal Test to Treat program to seek treatment. In this program, people can get tested for COVID-19 or present a positive test result, get a prescription for treatment from a health care provider (if appropriate), and have their prescription filled seamlessly. Find a Test to Treat location using CDPHE’s treatment map below. You can also view a list of Colorado’s Test to Treat sites.

 

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    Purple pins = Test to Treat providers
    Green pins = Monoclonal antibody treatment (Bebtelovimab)
    Yellow pins = Preventive monoclonal antibody therapy (Evusheld)
    Blue pins = Oral antivirals (Paxlovid and/or molnupiravir)
    Orange pins = Providers with multiple treatment types

    This map is updated every Tuesday and Thursday. Providers on this map may or may not currently have treatments available. Contact a location directly for more information. Talking to a health care provider can help you learn more about whether treatment is right for you.

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    Getting treatment

    There are a few ways to seek treatment in Colorado.

    If you have a doctor or health care provider:

    1. Call your provider. Tell them you have just tested positive for COVID-19, or suspect you have COVID-19, and want to learn more about treatment options.
    2. Your provider will ask you some questions. This will help them decide if treatment is right for you and what kind of treatment might be best.
    3. Your provider may recommend a specific kind of treatment. If they have the treatment on-hand, they may ask you to come into their office to receive it.
    4. If your provider does not have treatment in their office, you can use CDPHE’s treatments map to find a nearby location with the type of treatment your provider recommends.
    5. Tell your doctor or health care provider the name and phone number of the closest location that has the recommended treatment.
    6. Your doctor will write you a prescription and send it to the nearby location. 
    7. Go to the location. Depending on the type of treatment, you may receive an infusion on-site or pick up pills to take at home over the next few days.

    If you don’t have a doctor or health care provider, or you can’t reach your regular provider fast enough:

    Test to Treat or telehealth can help you seek treatment fast, even if you don’t have a provider or insurance. These options may have out-of-pocket fees for patients without insurance. Coloradans without insurance are encouraged to apply for Health First Colorado - Colorado's Medicaid Program.

    Test to Treat
    1. Call a Test to Treat location near you. Test to Treat locations are purple pins on the treatments map. They are also listed in the spreadsheet below.
    2. Tell them you think you might have COVID-19 and are interested in using the Test to Treat program to seek testing and treatment. 
    3. Go to the location and take a COVID-19 test at the clinic. (Some clinics will accept a positive test you’ve already taken at home. However, if you are seeking treatment at a King Soopers clinic, you must take your COVID-19 test on-site. You may bring an unopened rapid test to use at your appointment.) 
    4. If your test is positive, the provider will ask you some questions to find out if treatment is right for you and what kind of treatment you might be able to take. 
    5. If treatment makes sense for you, the provider will write you a prescription for antiviral pills. 
    6. You will be able pick up the prescription at the same location where you got tested or a location nearby.
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    Telehealth

    Telehealth means connecting with a health care provider over the phone or through a video call. 

    1. Find a telehealth provider and make an appointment. Many insurance companies provide telehealth services for their members. Contact your insurance company to learn if telehealth services are available through your plan. If you don’t have insurance, you can find an appointment using a fee-based telehealth company. Many providers offer same-day or next-day appointments.
    2. The telehealth provider will ask you some questions to find out if treatment is right for you and what kind of treatment you might be able to take.
    3. If the provider recommends treatment, they will write you a prescription and send it to a pharmacy or treatment location near you.
    4. Go to the location. Depending on the type of treatment, you may receive an infusion on-site or pick up pills to take at home over the next few days.

    Learn more about getting treatment using telehealth

     

    Types of treatment

    There are different types of treatments available in Colorado. Some treatments are given as infusions, either through an IV or through injections (like a vaccine). Other treatments are pills you take by mouth.

    Monoclonal antibody therapy 

    As of April 5, due to increased COVID-19 cases caused by the omicron BA.2 sub-variant, sotrovimab is no longer authorized by the FDA. Research shows it is unlikely to be effective against BA.2.

    Monoclonal antibody therapy is an infusion that helps your body fight COVID-19.

    Right now, there are two different types of monoclonal antibody therapies available in Colorado. 

    1. Bebtelovimab is for people who already have COVID-19, have mild to moderate symptoms, are at high risk of getting very sick, and can’t take other treatments like antiviral pills. 
    2. Evusheld is for people who don’t have COVID-19 and are moderately to severely immunocompromised or can’t get vaccinated against COVID-19. It can help keep you from getting sick with COVID-19.

    Bebtelovimab is for adults and children (12 years and older who weigh at least 40 kilograms (88 pounds). You may be able to get bebtelovimab if you:

    • Have tested positive for COVID-19.
    • Have had symptoms for seven days or less.
    • Are at high risk for severe COVID-19, including hospitalization or death.
    • Can’t receive other COVID-19 treatment options approved or authorized by the FDA.

    People who are hospitalized due to COVID-19 or require oxygen therapy or respiratory support due to COVID-19 can’t receive bebtelovimab. If you usually need oxygen therapy or respiratory support for reasons other than COVID-19, and you need an increase in baseline oxygen flow or respiratory support due to COVID-19, you also can’t receive bebtelovimab.

    People who are sick with certain variants of COVID-19 don’t respond well to bebtelovimab. If you are likely to have a resistant variant, your health care provider may choose to offer you a different kind of therapy.

    See Who is at high risk for serious COVID-19? to learn more.

    Evusheld is available as a preventive treatment for people who are moderately to severely immunocompromised and may not be fully protected after receiving a COVID-19 vaccine. It is also for people who cannot receive a COVID-19 vaccine due to an allergy. Only people who are not currently infected with COVID-19 and have not recently been exposed to COVID-19 can receive Evusheld.

    People who receive Evusheld can get a follow-up dose of the treatment every six months for ongoing protection.

    Evusheld is not a treatment for people who are already infected with COVID-19. It also can’t be used as post-exposure prophylaxis for people who have been exposed to COVID-19.

     

    Monoclonal antibody treatment gives you extra antibodies to help fight COVID-19. 

    Your body naturally makes antibodies to fight infection. However, it takes time for your body to make enough antibodies to fight a new virus like COVID-19. 

    Monoclonal antibodies are made in a laboratory to fight a particular infection—in this case, COVID-19. They are given with an infusion to help fight the infection faster than your body could do on its own. 

    Evidence suggests that monoclonal antibody treatment can reduce the amount of the COVID-19 virus in your system. This amount is called “viral load.” Having a lower viral load means you may have milder symptoms, which may make it less likely that you’ll need to go to the hospital.

     

    • Depending on what kind of treatment you get, you may receive the therapy through an IV or two injections.

      • Bebtelovimab is given through an IV infusion. This involves placing a needle in a vein and slowly sending the medicine into the body. It may take up to 30 minutes to receive the infusion. 

      • Evusheld is given through two intramuscular injections. This is similar to receiving a vaccine.

    • No matter what kind of treatment you receive, the provider treating you will ask you to stay in the office for one hour after the medication is given to make sure you don’t have an allergic reaction or other side effects that could require medical care. 

    • The whole appointment should last about an hour and a half.

    Antibody treatments may have side effects. 

    • Allergic reactions can happen during and after an antibody infusion. 

    • Tell your healthcare provider right away if you feel any of the following symptoms of allergic reactions: fever; chills; nausea; headache; shortness of breath; low blood pressure; wheezing; swelling of your lips, face, or throat; rash, including hives; itching; muscle aches; and/or dizziness. 

    • An infusion or injection of any medicine may cause brief pain, bleeding, bruising of the skin, soreness, swelling, and possible infection at the infusion site.

    • Talk to your doctor if you experience any side effect that bothers you or does not go away quickly.

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    Antivirals

    Antivirals are medicines that can help treat COVID-19. They are usually pills, but some antiviral medicine is given as an IV infusion. 

    As of now, the FDA has authorized or approved three different antivirals.

    1. Paxlovid

      • Paxlovid is a pill for people who have mild or moderate COVID-19 symptoms and are at high risk of getting very sick. People age 12 years or older who weigh at least 40 kilograms (about 88 pounds) can take Paxlovid. It is available by prescription only. 

      • People who are eligible for Paxlovid should receive it as soon as possible after they have been diagnosed with COVID-19, starting within five days of their first symptoms.

    2. Molnupiravir

      • Molnupiravir is a pill for people who have tested positive for COVID-19, are at high risk of getting very sick, and cannot receive other COVID-19 treatments. Only adults age 18 years and older can take molnupiravir. Molnupiravir is available by prescription only. 

      • People who are eligible for molnupiravir should receive it as soon as possible after they have been diagnosed with COVID-19, starting within five days of their first symptoms. 

      • Pregnant people should not take molnupiravir. People who may become pregnant should use effective birth control while they are receiving the treatment and for four days after their last dose.

      • Breastfeeding is not recommended while taking molnupiravir. If you are lactating while taking this treatment, you should pump and discard your breast milk until four days have passed since your last dose.

    3. Remdesivir

      • Remdesivir (Veklury) is an IV infusion for people who have tested positive for COVID-19 and are at high risk of getting very sick. Some people who are in the hospital for COVID-19 can also receive remdesivir. Remdesivir can be given to patients of all ages, including adults and children as young as 28 days old who weigh at least 3 kilograms (about 7 pounds).

      • People who are eligible for remdesivir should receive it as soon as possible after they have been diagnosed with COVID-19, starting within seven days of their first symptoms.

      • Note: Because Colorado providers do not receive remdesivir from federal allocations, it is not displayed on CDPHE’s treatments map. Contact your health care provider directly to learn more about remdesivir.

    Right now, oral antivirals (Paxlovid and molnupiravir) are authorized for people who:

    • Are age 12 years or older for Pfizer’s Paxlovid or age 18 years or older for Merck’s molnupiravir, and 

    • Have tested positive for COVID-19, and

    • Have had symptoms for less than five days, and

    • Are at high risk of becoming seriously ill. People at at high risk of becoming seriously ill from COVID-19 include:

      • People who are 65 years old or older.

      • People who are overweight or obese. This includes adults with a BMI of 25 or more. It also includes children under age 18 years old whose providers determine they meet the criteria.

      • Pregnant people (for Paxlovid only).

      • People with certain underlying medical conditions.

    Right now, the intravenous antiviral remdesivir (Veklury) is approved for people who:

    • Are adults or children 28 days or older weighing at least 3 kilograms (about 7 pounds), and

    • Have tested positive for COVID-19, and

    • Have had symptoms for less than 7 days, and

    • Are at high risk of becoming seriously ill. People at at high risk of becoming seriously ill from COVID-19 include:

      • People who are 65 years old or older.

      • Infants under 1 year old.

      • People who are obese or overweight. This includes adults with a BMI of 25 or more. It also includes children under age 18 years old whose providers determine they meet the criteria.

      • Pregnant people.

      • People with certain underlying medical conditions.

    See Who is at high risk for serious COVID-19? to learn more.

    Antivirals are not a substitute for vaccination against COVID-19. Getting vaccinated is the best way to keep from getting sick with COVID-19. 

    • Paxlovid

      • Paxlovid consists of two different medications taken at the same time. The first is called nirmatrelvir. This medicine stops the COVID-19 virus from copying itself. The second is called ritonavir. Ritonavir helps keep nirmatrelvir from breaking down in the body, helping it work longer.

      • Paxlovid is usually administered as three tablets (two tablets of nirmatrelvir and one tablet of ritonavir) taken together orally twice daily for five days, for a total of 30 tablets. Some people with kidney disease may take only two tablets together twice daily for five days, for a total of 20 tablets.

    • Molnupiravir

      • Molnupiravir works by introducing errors into the COVID-19 virus’s genetic code. This prevents the virus from copying itself.

      • Molnupiravir is administered as four capsules taken orally every 12 hours for five days, for a total of 40 capsules.

    • Remdesivir

      • Remdesivir stops the COVID-19 virus from copying itself.

      • Remdesivir is given as an intravenous infusion once a day for three days.

    Paxlovid and molnupiravir are taken for five consecutive days. Remdesivir is used for three days.

    • Paxlovid

      • Possible side effects of Paxlovid include impaired sense of taste, diarrhea, high blood pressure, and muscle aches.

      • Using Paxlovid in people with uncontrolled or undiagnosed HIV-1 infection may lead to HIV-1 drug resistance.

      • Ritonavir may cause liver damage, so caution should be exercised when giving Paxlovid to patients with preexisting liver diseases, liver enzyme abnormalities, or liver inflammation.

      • Using Paxlovid at the same time as certain other drugs may result in potentially significant drug interactions. Find a list of those drugs on Paxlovid’s FDA fact sheet.

      • There is no experience treating pregnant or breastfeeding people with Paxlovid. For a pregnant person and unborn baby, the benefit of taking Paxlovid may be greater than the risk from the treatment. If you are pregnant, discuss your options and specific situation with your health care provider. 

    • Molnupiravir

      • Side effects observed in clinical trials included diarrhea, nausea, and dizziness.

      • Molnupiravir is not recommended for use during pregnancy. Pregnant people should only take molnupiravir if their health care provider decides that the benefits outweigh the risks.

      • People who may become pregnant should use a reliable method of birth control correctly and consistently while taking molnupiravir and for four days after the final dose.

      • If you are sexually active with a partner who might become pregnant, you should use a reliable method of birth control consistently and currently while you are taking molnupiravir and for at least three months after the last dose. 

    • Remdesivir

      • Possible side effects of remdesivir include nausea and abnormal liver tests.

      • Using remdesivir at the same time as certain other drugs may result in decreased effectiveness of remdesivir.

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    The table on this page is only intended to provide information on the current distribution of treatments in the state. Patients should contact a health care provider first to make sure they are recommended to receive COVID-19 treatments.

    Data provided on this page are accurate as of 3 p.m. MST the prior day.

    Populations Served

    The “Pop_Served” column indicates what population the listed provider serves. The general public may not be able to access therapeutics from certain providers depending on the population the facility serves. Where LTCF, DOC or IHS is denoted, these facilities serve only those specific populations.

    Specialized Facility Types (key)

    • LTCF | Long-term care facility
    • DOC | Department of Corrections
    • IHS | Indian Health Service