COVID-19 treatments

Monocolonal Antibody graphic

Last updated November 24, 2021.

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Looking for treatment? Here’s what to do:

If you have tested positive for COVID-19, you may be able to get monoclonal antibody treatment to help you recover. This treatment can help keep you from getting seriously sick and keep you out of the hospital. Monoclonal antibody treatments are not a substitute for vaccination against COVID-19. Getting vaccinated is the best way to keep from getting sick with COVID-19.

Find out if you’re eligible: You might be eligible for treatment if you have tested positive for COVID-19, your symptoms started within the last 10 days, you aren’t hospitalized or on oxygen due to COVID-19, and you are at risk of getting very sick without treatment. People as young as 12 years old can get monoclonal antibody treatment.

People at risk of getting very sick include:

  • People who are 65 years old or older.
  • People who are obese or overweight. This includes adults with a BMI of 25 or more. It also includes children age 12 to 17 who have a BMI in the 85th percentile or higher for their age and gender based on CDC growth charts.
  • Pregnant people.
  • People with certain underlying medical conditions.

You can get monoclonal antibody treatment even if you are fully vaccinated and have a breakthrough case.

How to get treatment: There are three ways to get treatment in Colorado.

  1. Schedule an appointment at a state-led clinic. You do not need a prescription to make an appointment at a state-led clinic. However, you must have an appointment in order to receive treatment. Call the COVID-19 hotline at 1-877-CO VAX CO (1-877-268-2926) for help making an appointment. The hotline is available Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. MT. The call center will be closed on Nov. 25, Dec. 25, and Jan. 1 for the holidays. You can also find a list of upcoming available appointments at COMassVax.org.
  2. Talk with your doctor or health care provider. Let them know you have tested positive for COVID-19 and want to get monoclonal antibody treatment. If you are eligible, your health care provider will write a prescription for you and help you find a place to get treatment.
  3. Reach out to a health care provider who is offering treatment in Colorado. Here is a map of places where you can get treatment. You can also find places to get treatment at The National Infusion Center Association or the HHS Protect Locator.

Find a bus near you

Click on the name of each bus to find upcoming monoclonal antibody therapy appointments. Sites are closed on Sundays.

Closure alert - The Durango location at 2500 Main Ave will be closed on Monday 12/6.

Denver Bus 5075 Lincoln St. Denver 80216 12/4 & 12/6
Colorado Springs Bus 750 Citadel Dr. Colorado Springs 80909 12/4 & 12/6
Durango Bus 2500 Main Ave Durango 81301 12/4 only
Grand Junction Bus 2938 North Ave Grand Junction 81504 12/4 & 12/6
Pueblo Bus 3429 Dillon Dr. Pueblo 81008 12/4 & 12/6
Craig Bus 1111 W. Victory Way Craig 81625 12/4 & 12/6

 

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Overview

COVID-19 monoclonal antibodies can help prevent severe illness for some people who get infected with COVID-19. The FDA has authorized these antibody treatments for emergency use. The treatments are available to people who have tested positive for COVID-19, have mild to moderate symptoms, and are at high risk of developing severe illness.

Monoclonal antibodies are also available as post-exposure prophylaxis (prevention) fgor COVID-19 for people who are not fully vaccinated (or who may not be fully protected after vaccination, such as people with immunocompromising conditions) and have been exposed to someone with COVID-19 and are at high risk of developing severe illness. They may also be used as a post-exposure prophylaxis for people who are at high risk of exposure to COVID-19, such as an unvaccinated resident in a nursing home where there is a new COVID-19 outbreak.

If you test positive for COVID-19 or have been exposed to COVID-19 and are not fully vaccinated or are concerned you may not adequately respond to vaccination, and you are at high risk of developing severe COVID-19 due to your age or medical condition, contact your health care provider to find out if you are eligible for monoclonal antibody treatment. Additionally, health care providers interested in offering monoclonal antibody treatments can contact CDPHE at cdphe.commentsoepr@state.co.us for assistance to become a monoclonal antibody site.

Monoclonal antibody therapy is not a substitute for vaccination against COVID-19. Getting vaccinated is the best way to keep from getting sick with COVID-19.

Scientific studies show that high-risk COVID-19 patients treated with monoclonal antibodies were significantly less likely to get very sick and/or need to be hospitalized compared to patients who did not receive the treatment. Studies have shown that being treated with monoclonal antibodies reduces the risk of getting COVID-19 if you have been exposed to a person who has COVID-19.

Monoclonal antibody treatments involve the use of one or a combination of monoclonal antibody products. The currently authorized treatments are bamlanivimab/etesevimab, REGEN-COV (casirivimab in combination with imdevimab) and sotrovimab. Bamlanivimab/etesevimab and REGEN-COV are also authorized to be used for post-exposure prophylaxis in people exposed to COVID-19. Bamlanivimab/etesevimab will remain available as long as variants resistant to it (B.1.351/Beta, P.1/Gamma, AY.1, AY.2, and B.1.621) comprise less than 5% of circulating variants. Find Colorado variant data on the COVID-19 data dashboard.

Bamlanivimab/etesevimab, REGEN-COV, and sotrovimab are free. All treatments are paid for through Medicaid, Medicare, and many health insurance plans. Some sites may still charge an administration fee.
 

Resources for further information on monoclonal antibody treatments:

Monoclonal antibody treatments for people infected with COVID-19

Monoclonal antibody treatments are available for people who test positive for COVID-19 with an onset of symptoms within 10 days and are not hospitalized, but who are at high risk of developing severe COVID-19. 

The following medical conditions or other factors may place adults and pediatric patients (age 12-17 years and weighing at least 40 kg) at higher risk for severe COVID-19:

  • Older age (≥65 years of age).
  • Obesity or being overweight (adults with BMI >25 kg/m, or if age 12-17, have BMI ≥85th percentile for their age and gender based on CDC growth charts).
  • Pregnancy.
  • Chronic kidney disease.
  • Diabetes.
  • Immunosuppressive disease or immunosuppressive treatment.
  • Cardiovascular disease (including congenital heart disease) or hypertension.
  • Chronic lung diseases (for example, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma [moderate-to-severe], interstitial lung disease, cystic fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension).
  • Sickle cell disease.
  • Neurodevelopmental disorders (for example, cerebral palsy) or other conditions that confer medical complexity (for example, genetic or metabolic syndromes and severe congenital anomalies).
  • Having a medical-related technological dependence (for example, tracheostomy, gastrostomy, or positive pressure ventilation not related to COVID-19).

Other medical conditions or factors (for example, race, or ethnicity) may place individual patients at high risk for severe COVID-19. Authorization of monoclonal antibody therapy under the EUAs is not limited to the medical conditions or factors listed above. For more information on medical conditions and factors associated with increased risk, see the CDC’s website. Health care providers should consider the benefit-risk ratio for individual patients. 

Monoclonal antibody treatments are not for use on patients who are hospitalized, on oxygen for COVID-19 treatment, or require an increase in baseline oxygen flow rate due to COVID-19.

These outpatient treatments are administered intravenously (IV) or subcutaneously (SQ) at hospitals, outpatient infusion centers, and doctors' offices. IV administration requires a single infusion administered over an hour or less. SQ administration involves four injections. Currently, only REGEN-COV is available for SQ administration. IV and SQ administration are followed by one hour of monitoring. 
 

Monoclonal antibody treatments for those exposed to COVID-19 or who are at high risk of exposure to COVID-19

Bamlanivimab/etesevimab and REGEN-COV are approved for use to prevent COVID-19 after exposure in adults and pediatric patients (age 12-17 years and weighing at least 40 kg) who:

  • Are at high risk of developing severe illness; AND

  • Are not fully vaccinated OR are not expected to adequately respond to a COVID-19 vaccination (for example, people with immunocompromising conditions and those taking immunosuppressive medications); AND

  • Have been exposed to an individual infected with COVID-19 consistent with close contact criteria per the CDC (someone who has been within six feet of an infected person for a total of 15 minutes or more over a 24-hour period) OR are at high risk of exposure to an individual infected with COVID-19 because of occurrence of COVID-19 infection in other individuals in the same institutional setting.

If you are not fully vaccinated for COVID-19 (or are concerned you may not respond well to a vaccine) and have been exposed to COVID-19, contact your health care provider to find out if you are eligible for monoclonal antibody therapy.

Standing Order - Authorizing Colorado Monoclonal Infusion/Injection Team (CMIIT) providers to administer REGEN-COV monoclonal antibody therapy without a prescription and in accordance with established protocols.

FAQ

Extending access to COVID-19 monoclonal antibody therapy to all Coloradans is a priority. Distribution of bamlanivamab/etesevimab, REGEN-COV, and sotrovimab is coordinated by CDPHE as of September 13, 2021, and we are working to make sure that eligible Coloradoans all over the state have access to this therapy.

You can schedule an appointment at a state-led clinic. You must have an appointment to receive treatment at a state-led clinic. You do not need a prescription in order to make an appointment at a state-led clinic. However, you must have an appointment in order to receive treatment. Call the COVID-19 hotline at 1-877-CO VAX CO (1-877-268-2926) for help making an appointment. The hotline is available Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. MT. The call center will be closed on Nov. 25, Dec. 25, and Jan. 1 for the holidays. You can also find a list of upcoming available appointments at COMassVax.org.

Talk with your doctor or health care provider. Let them know you have tested positive for COVID-19 and want to get monoclonal antibody treatment. If you are eligible, your health care provider will write a prescription for you and help you find a place to get treatment.

Reach out to a health care provider that is offering treatment in Colorado. Click here for a map of places where you can get treatment. You can also find places to get treatment at The National Infusion Center Association or the HHS Protect Locator.

Bamlanivimab/etesevimab, REGEN-COV, and sotrovimab are free of charge to requesting sites. Each week, CDPHE receives an allotment of these three products to distribute to administering sites in Colorado. To request these products, sites must contact CDPHE at cdphe.commentsoepr@state.co.us to register as a provider and fill out the REDCap form available here by 11:59 p.m. on Wednesday each week for delivery the following week.

Consider providing this therapy in your office. The state can have doses shipped to your office for administration either through IV infusion or through subcutaneous injection. We encourage medical providers to offer this treatment in their offices; a positive antigen test in the clinician be followed immediately with monoclonal antibody therapy. Providers can also use the COVID-19 Monoclonal Antibody Connector tool to find a site for their patients to receive monoclonal antibodies. 
Use of the Connector Tool is not required for sites or referring providers (no provider referral is required for treatment); a limited number of sites have opted in to receive referrals through the system. The Connector Tool is meant to provide a list of nearby sites for treatment and to send these sites a notification of the patient’s eligibility for therapy. Every medical provider should learn of the treatment centers available nearby, their processes for scheduling patients for treatment, and if they prefer to have patient referrals entered in the Connector Tool.

The final page of the monoclonal antibody Connector Tool includes a list and map of current monoclonal antibody treatment administration sites that have asked to be listed in the connector tool. You and your patient can select the preferred location to receive treatment. The site will be notified of the selection and the patient can then contact the site to schedule treatment.

If the site selected is unable to accommodate your patient, you will need to select another location. When you have done so, you must notify the original site in order for the patient’s record to be transferred to the new treatment location.

Information on monoclonal antibody therapy and access to administration for all Coloradans can be found through the University of Colorado.


Eligibility Determination